ABURY meets Moroccan artisan Monsieur Omar

Monsieur Omar is a Moroccan artisan ABURY works with and the maker of the ABURY Berber Collection. He truly is a master at working with leather and silk yarn, creating pieces that are no less than art! The way his hands dance around the piece of leather working the embroidery is truly amazing.

Monsieur Omar, married and with two children, is practicing the craft as a family tradition – in fact, leather embroidery has been part of the family for many generations. He is proud of this tradition, to be a Moroccan artisan and he is also proud of his son, who is able to go to a good school in Marrakech. The small atelier Monsieur Omar is working in is owned by his family.

On my regular visits to Morocco I often visit Monsieur Omar. This time I have spoken to him a bit longer about his work, about Morocco and about his life.


 

Moroccan artisan Monsieur Omar working on crafts in his atelier
Start by tagging yourself with three words.

Confidence, Love/Dedication, Work.

We believe that hands tell stories. Being a Moroccan artisan, your hands surely do, too. What do they tell about you?

My hands tell many stories. One story is how I learned my metier. I went to school and in the afternoon I watched my father always working. And I learned the work that my hand do today just by watching – I never had a teacher or went to a embroidery training. I love the work.

Making of ipad leather case embroidery

What is the last thing you created with your hands?

The last thing I did is a bag for my wife!

If you could choose, what would you like to be able to do with your hands?

I would love to build a house out of leather.

Looking back on everything you’ve done in your life, what is the one thing you are proudest of?

I am really proud of my children!

One of a mind underlines our strong belief in equality and the value of sharing. How does intercultural exchange benefit our global society in your eyes?

For meitis really inspiring to work with the designers of ABURY.

Moroccan Artisan Monsieur Omar and Andrea Bury talking

What makes Morocco special? What do you love about the Moroccan culture?

The special about Morocco is the variety and quality of craftsmanship!

Talking about other senses, how would you describe the Tastes of Morocco and what is your favourite?

My favorite taste is the Couscous with vegetables and meat – I love it since I am a child – it is the most traditional dish, but I love it.

According to some craftspeople, every artisan has their own craft language. How would you describe yours?

I am not doing what the others do. Many artisans here just copy. What I try is always to make the difference – to go one step further.

What do you like most about being an artisan working for ABURY?

ABURY gave me a lot already. First I love that through my work with ABURY I can help the poor people in Morocco. I was taught the women in the village embroidery as well and I see the children going to school. And through the work with the designers I learned and learn a lot. I would have never done ipad bags, clutches or wallets. This is exciting to learn something new.

Moroccan artisan holding finished embroidered ipad case

If you could go anywhere in the world where would that be and why?

Germany – obviously 🙂

Apart from practicing your craft, what else do you like to do?

I love football. In fact, I play myself – and my favourite player is Ronaldo. I have already embroidered a bag for the mother of Ronaldo.

Andrea Bury

Andrea Bury

Andrea Bury is a marketing expert, story teller and social entrepreneur. After having lived and worked in several countries in Europe she moved to Marrakesh in 2007 to renovate a riad - the AnaYela, a "Place of Inspiration". Living there inspired her to create ABURY. Today she is living in Berlin, the birthplace of the ABURY flagship store.

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